Before You Go And Quit Your Job

quit

“My job is sucking the life out of me.”

“I want to do something more inclined to my skills.”

“I don’t feel called to my job anymore.”

Just this week alone, I’ve spoken to easily three people with the intent of quitting their day job. All three of them were convinced that they were in a job that was underutilizing and limiting them, and that God was calling them to another field or work environment.

But deep down I knew that only one of those three people was really called to another job. The other two? I think they were where they needed to be.

A recent report by Gallup shows that 21 percent of millennials have changed jobs at least once in the past year. Millennial turnover costs the US economy over $30.5 Billion annually. But the question that remains is this- should you really leave your job or not?

Here are three things, I implore for all those looking to quit their jobs to do before turning in that resignation letter.

1. Don’t skip the stepping stone

Every job is an opportunity to greater position, compensation and authority in the future. But as the Bible tells us, “One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much.”

So maybe the job you have isn’t your goal, but ask yourself- can this job be a stepping stone for me to reach my dreams? Every job gives us an opportunity to learn, grow, save, invest, build networks and build value.

2. Think about the people you serve

The work itself might not excite you, but you’ll be surprised how little that should matter. In Tom Rath’s book, “Vital Friends,” he shares that one of the most important factors to job satisfaction is not money, work or authority. It’s actually people.

Think about the people that you serve through your job. Seeing it from the point of view that you make their lives better will help you appreciate what you do more. Moreover, think as well of the people you serve with. Do you have friends in the work place that you could consider to be a true source of your joy?

3. Build on skills not preferences

Everyone wants to be the CEO of the company. However, only very few of them put have the skills necessary to become one. Simply wanting and preferring a job title, salary bracket or lifestyle won’t get you anywhere.

If anything, preference needs to turn into determination which will then result into a resolve to grow skills necessary to grow in certain skills that we will use. More than focusing on what you want to do, focus instead on what you’re actually good at and grow in that area.

Leave a Reply